About Us

"To promote the issue of, to foster research in, and to educate the public on gender inequality in the collegiate community and professional world."

Eye2Eye is a service organization founded by students at Alpha Kappa Psi Nu Chapter at Boston University in 2016. The inspiration to start Eye2Eye started in the spring of 2016 with a few students from Boston University. Having experienced and witnessed gender inequality firsthand within the business school at BU and throughout multiple industries, coupled with eye-opening research conducted by organizations like the ITUC, pushed the team to create Eye2Eye. As a start to its journey, Eye2Eye has two main goals:

Hold a National Conference

to bring together professionals from various industries to discuss gender inequality and the best ways to fight it.

Conduct Proprietary Research

at BU to share at our national conference and begin to expand to other universities, becoming the nation's leading collegiate gender inequality research platform.

We've decided to focus our efforts by breaking down the issue in four categories as defined by The 3% Movement's "Elephant on Madison Avenue" survey. The survey was able to collect over 500 stories of gender inequality in the workplace and broke down some of the issues into the following categories:


Sexual Harassment + Toxic Culture

Pay Inequality

Lack of Opportunity & Visibility

The Motherhood Penalty


The research continues and the issue of gender inequality is undeniable; something needs to happen. Eye2Eye is fully committed to continue collecting research and help raise awareness on the issue. With our annual conference, we aim to invite professionals from all industries from over the country to talk, discuss, and highlight some of the issues they have faced and noticed as well as how they work to combat this epidemic. Besides the conference, our team will be working hard to research different industries and gender inequality specific to Boston University. If our research is informational and unique, we hope to expand to other universities and help lead the gender inequality research platform among colleges throughout the United States.

How Can You Help

Eye2Eye wants to see a fairer, more equal and just workforce, where hard work, talent, and determination are the main measures of success. In order to achieve our milestones, we need your help. With your support, we can develop a platform that fosters change and raises the awareness that has been mute in many communities. Please help us spread our mission by sharing our website and name. Additionally, please consider donating to our fund to help us create a meaningful and impactful conference; every dollar helps tremendously. Click on the button below to see our rewards categories and make your tax-deductible donation! We thank you for your support!



$2,680 Donated So Far

Research

Research being everyday proves that there is a problem. For example, according to public information collected by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), "the global gender pay gap ranges from 3 percent to 51 percent with a global average of 17 percent." As noted in You Can't See the Future From the Man-Cave by Faith Popcorn of the Huffington Post, "A study by Catalyst found that those Fortune 500 companies with the most female directors outperformed those with few, or none. And those with at least three women at the boardroom table dramatically outperformed the rest. And the numbers were huge: 84 percent return on sales; 60 greater percent return on invested capital, and 46 percent greater return on equity."

To combat the problem Eye2Eye has decided to begin doing it's own research, right here at home. While we have decided to present our findings at our conference this coming spring, our research analysts have started blogging about their experiences. You can see the full list of articles on our blog page or check out our last few articles below.

The Bright Future of Women in Finance

Karen Rodriguez  | April 7, 2017

Last March 8th, during International Women’s Day, a statue of a girl defiantly standing in front of the iconic bull statue in Wall street sparked conversation regarding the huge misrepresentation of women in certain fields like finance.

 

This statue was part of a campaign ignited by State Street, an asset management firm that manages around 11% of the world’s assets, that seeks to get more women in corporate boards. This action was followed up with a letter directed to all of the companies that comprised the Russell 3000 index, persuading them to take action and add women to their boards.

 

It is a fact that women are clearly underrepresented in this industry, a Morningstar study showed that “Less than 10% of all U.S. fund managers are women; women exclusively run about 2% of the industry’s assets and open-end funds. By contrast, men exclusively run about 74% of the industry’s assets and 78% of funds, with mixed-gender teams accounting for the balance.” This phenomenon is true not only in senior levels, but all across the industry. According to a Harvard Business Review research, in other specific areas in finance like private equity, venture capital, and real estate women make up only 17 percent to 23 percent of all employees.

The Bright Future of Women in Finance

Karen Rodriguez  | April 7, 2017

Last March 8th, during International Women’s Day, a statue of a girl defiantly standing in front of the iconic bull statue in Wall street sparked conversation regarding the huge misrepresentation of women in certain fields like finance.

 

This statue was part of a campaign ignited by State Street, an asset management firm that manages around 11% of the world’s assets, that seeks to get more women in corporate boards. This action was followed up with a letter directed to all of the companies that comprised the Russell 3000 index, persuading them to take action and add women to their boards.

 

It is a fact that women are clearly underrepresented in this industry, a Morningstar study showed that “Less than 10% of all U.S. fund managers are women; women exclusively run about 2% of the industry’s assets and open-end funds. By contrast, men exclusively run about 74% of the industry’s assets and 78% of funds, with mixed-gender teams accounting for the balance.” This phenomenon is true not only in senior levels, but all across the industry. According to a Harvard Business Review research, in other specific areas in finance like private equity, venture capital, and real estate women make up only 17 percent to 23 percent of all employees.